Opened World: Walled City

Kane & Lynch 2: Dog Days depicts transition, poverty, and the marginalized. In an interview within Heterotopias conducted by Martin and the game’s art director Rasmus Poulsen, the latter underlines an interest in showing unseen parts of the city such as alleyways and corridors lined with trash. Dog Days is a game about the ugly … Continue reading Opened World: Walled City

Beyond the Ordinary: Why Everything Should Be Put Into a Video Game

That everything should be put into a video game simply suggests that the typically excluded banality of everyday life should not be underestimated as a source of meaning. Instead of a focus on action-heavy shooter gameplay or sci-fi indulgence, the turn towards candid gestures like looking out through a window at nothing in particular can … Continue reading Beyond the Ordinary: Why Everything Should Be Put Into a Video Game

Healing and Togetherness As Metaphor in Ico & Games Criticism

1. Contained within this piece are two related arguments. On the one hand, I offer my initial Blogs of the Round Table investigation on healing and save points in Fumito Ueda’s Ico, examining the game’s emphasis on handholding and mutual rest as indicative of broader themes of unspoken solidarity. On the other hand (and against … Continue reading Healing and Togetherness As Metaphor in Ico & Games Criticism

Missed Shot: No Case for Need for Speed: The Run

Like EA Black Box’s previous game Need for Speed: Undercover, The Run attempts to expand racing game formulae with a generic crime storyline overlaid atop familiar driving gameplay. However, the developer’s endeavours to introduce features such as on-foot quick time events and encounters with armed enemies only connect the game with cheap, B-tier action/crime titles … Continue reading Missed Shot: No Case for Need for Speed: The Run